Melbourne seminars, April 2019

 

Seminar: spectral cytometry and computational analysis of single-cell data

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Date/time: Wednesday 3-April, 10 am - 11 am.
Location: Cox Room, Level 5, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

Summary: A key limitation in flow cytometry is the number of fluorophores that can be used at once, due to the number of detectors and the overlap of fluorescent spectra. As our understanding of the the complexity of immune subsets grows, access to more of the spectrum is required for this technology to stay relevant. Spectral cytometry, which measures the whole spectrum rather than distinct sections, has been presented as an alternative. In this seminar we will discuss the advantages of spectral cytometry in immune profiling. Additionally, as the number of parameters that we can measure by flow (~30-parameter) or mass (~50 parameter) cytometry increases, so too does the complexity of the data we are able to generate. As such, in this seminar we will discuss different approaches to computational data analysis, with a particular focus on clustering tools (such as FlowSOM) and dimensionality reduction tools (such as tSNE and UMAP) for large cytometry datasets. For more information, visit https://sydneycytometry.org.au.

About the speaker

Thomas Ashhurst (thomas.ashhurst@sydney.edu.au) is a high-dimensional cytometry specialist at the Sydney Cytometry Facility (The University of Sydney and Centenary Institute). Thomas is an internationally recognised expert in the application of high-dimensional cytometry techniques (flow, mass, and imaging mass cytometry) to the study of infectious disease and immunity, including the mobilisation of the murine haematopoietic system in response to viral encephalitis.

 

Seminar: computational analysis of single-cell cytometry data

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Date/time: Wednesday 3-April, 3 pm - 4 pm.
Location: Theatre 1, Albert Gilbert Building G21 The University of Melbourne

Summary: As the number of parameters that we can measure by flow (~30- parameter) or mass (~50 parameter) cytometry increases, so too does the complexity of the data we are able to generate. As such, manual methods of analysis (such as 'gating') are not always suitable for the analysis of these datasets. Various computational tools can be harnessed to aid in the analysis of these datasets, but the use of these tools needs to be well considered. In this seminar we will discuss different approaches to high-dimensional cytometry data analysis, with a particular focus on the utility of gating, clustering (such as FlowSOM), and dimensionality reduction tools (such as tSNE and UMAP) for large cytometry datasets. We will end with a focus on the best practices that are required to validate these types of complex analysis, in order to generate reliable datasets. For more information, visit https://sydneycytometry.org.au/computational-analysis.

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About the speaker

Thomas Ashhurst (thomas.ashhurst@sydney.edu.au) is a high-dimensional cytometry specialist at the Sydney Cytometry Facility (The University of Sydney and Centenary Institute). Thomas is an internationally recognised expert in the application of high-dimensional cytometry techniques (flow, mass, and imaging mass cytometry) to the study of infectious disease and immunity, including the mobilisation of the murine haematopoietic system in response to viral encephalitis.